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DNA evolution in krill : molecular phylogenetics and population genetics of Euphausiacea (Crustacea: Malacostraca) and their close relatives

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Jarman, Simon Neil (2001) DNA evolution in krill : molecular phylogenetics and population genetics of Euphausiacea (Crustacea: Malacostraca) and their close relatives. PhD thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

The evolutionary history of krill (Euphausiacea: Crustacea) was studied through information
held in their DNA. The earliest events in the evolution of this group were investigated by
phylogenetic analysis of slowly evolving nuclear DNA sequences of krill and their near relatives.
These analyses established the sister taxon of krill to be the Mysida. Molecular dating
techniques suggested that krill diverged from the Mysida in the upper Carboniferous, two
lineages of krill survived the end Cretaceous extinctions, and the extant genera of
Euphausiidae radiated during the early Palaeogene. More recent speciation events in the krill
genus Euphausia were studied by phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences. A
comparison between the speciation history of Euphausia and that of freshwater crustaceans in
the Anaspididae was made because the Anaspididae are close relatives of krill and have
undisputable barriers to migration between populations that are not present for krill. This
comparison suggests that genetic differentiation in Euphausia may involve parapatric or even
sympatric processes. Microevolution in the krill species Euphausia crystallorophias was
studied by comparing allele frequencies between populations of krill from different parts of its
range. Features of the genome of Euphausia superba were characterized in order to compare
its qualities with the genomes of other metazoans.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: Krill, Euphausiacea
Copyright Holders: The Author
Additional Information:

Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Tasmania, 2001. Includes bibliographical references

Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2014 02:41
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2016 05:54
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