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Does BMI moderate the effects of social cues on snacking?

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Revell, SR 2016 , 'Does BMI moderate the effects of social cues on snacking?', Honours thesis, University of Tasmania.

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Abstract

The aim of the present study is to investigate BMI as a predictor of the likelihood that social cues effect snacking behaviour. Increased BMI is associated with increased impulsivity and poor self-regulation. Snacking in a social context is largely ambiguous so overweight and obese individuals rely on social norms to guide their eating behaviours to manage the impression others have of them. Therefore, it is expected that BMI will moderate the effects of social cues on snacking. More specifically it is hypothesised that BMI will moderate the effect of seeing others eating on snacking. When overweight and obese individuals lack a social reference their behaviour will reflect impulsivity eating behaviour. As such, it is also hypothesised that BMI will moderate the effect of being alone on Snacking. Over a 14-day period, 112 non-clinical individuals from the general population used Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) devices to record their eating behaviours and social surroundings in real-time. As hypothesised, BMI moderated the effects of social cues on snacking. Participants with a higher BMI were more likely to consume low-energy snacks when others were eating compared to participants with a lower BMI. Participants with a higher BMI were more likely to consume high-energy snacks when alone than participants with a lower BMI. This indicate that BMI moderates the relationship of social influences on snacking behaviour.

Item Type: Thesis - Honours
Authors/Creators:Revell, SR
Keywords: BMI, Body Mass Index, Social Cues, Impression Management, Snacking, Discretionary
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Copyright 2016 the author

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