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Partnering and parenting transitions associate with changing smoking status: a cohort study in young Australians

Tian, J ORCID: 0000-0001-7746-7782, Gall, S ORCID: 0000-0002-5138-2526, Patton, G, Dwyer, T and Venn, A ORCID: 0000-0001-7090-1398 2017 , 'Partnering and parenting transitions associate with changing smoking status: a cohort study in young Australians' , International Journal of Public Health, vol. 62, no. 8 , pp. 889-897 , doi: 10.1007/s00038-017-0984-3.

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Abstract

Objectives: To examine the effects of partnering and parenting transitions on smoking continuity in young adults.Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted involving 1084 young smokers and former smokers who completed questionnaires at baseline (2004-2006, aged 26-36 years) and 5 years later.Results: 233/570 (40.9%) smokers quit and 58/514 (11.3%) former smokers resumed smoking during follow-up. For partnering transitions, compared with remaining not partnered, the likelihood of quitting was higher among men who became (RR 2.84 95% CI 1.62, 4.98) or stayed (RR 2.12, 95% CI 1.18, 3.80) partnered and women who became partnered (RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.03, 2.18). People who became (RR 0.14, 95% CI 0.03, 0.58) or stayed (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.27, 0.95) partnered had a lower risk of resuming smoking than their continuously not partnered peers. For parenting transitions, having a first child born increased women's probability of quitting smoking relative to remaining childless (RR 1.74, 95% CI 1.30, 2.33), while having additional children did not.Conclusions: The benefits of partnering were greater for men than women and transition into parenthood was of greater benefit to women.

Item Type: Article
Authors/Creators:Tian, J and Gall, S and Patton, G and Dwyer, T and Venn, A
Keywords: longitudinal studies, marital status, parenthood, smoking cessation
Journal or Publication Title: International Journal of Public Health
Publisher: Springer Basel AG
ISSN: 1661-8556
DOI / ID Number: 10.1007/s00038-017-0984-3
Copyright Information:

Copyright 2017 Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+)

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