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Trends in reports of driving following illicit drug consumption among regular drug users in Australia, 2007–2013: Has random roadside drug testing had a deterrent effect?

Horyniak, D, Dietze, P, Lenton, S, Alati, R, Bruno, R ORCID: 0000-0001-6673-833X, Matthews, A ORCID: 0000-0003-2961-9125, Breen, C and Burns, L 2017 , 'Trends in reports of driving following illicit drug consumption among regular drug users in Australia, 2007–2013: Has random roadside drug testing had a deterrent effect?' , Accident Analysis and Prevention , pp. 146-155 , doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2017.05.008.

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Abstract

Introduction: Driving following illicit drug consumption (‘drug-driving’) is a potential road safety risk. Roadsidedrug testing (RDT) is conducted across Australia with the dual aims of prosecuting drivers with drugs in theirsystem and deterring drug-driving. We examined trends over time in self-reported past six-month drug-drivingamong sentinel samples of regular drug users and assessed the impact of experiences of RDT on drug-drivingamong these participants.Methods: Data from 1913 people who inject drugs (PWID) and 3140 regular psychostimulant users (RPU) whowere first-time participants in a series of repeat cross-sectional sentinel studies conducted in Australian capitalcities from 2007 to 2013 and reported driving in the past six months were analysed. Trends over time wereassessed using the χ2 test for trend. Multivariable logistic regressions assessed the relationship betweenexperiences of RDT and recent drug-driving, adjusting for survey year, jurisdiction of residence and sociodemographicand drug use characteristics.Results: The percentage of participants reporting recent (past six months) drug-driving decreased significantlyover time among both samples (PWID: 83% [2007] vs. 74% [2013], p Conclusion: Although there is some evidence that drug-driving among key risk groups of regular drug users isdeclining in Australia, possibly reflecting a general deterrent effect of RDT, experiencing RDT appears to have nospecific deterrent effect on drug-driving. Further intervention, with a particular focus on changing attitudestowards drug-driving, may be needed to further reduce this practice among these groups.

Item Type: Article
Authors/Creators:Horyniak, D and Dietze, P and Lenton, S and Alati, R and Bruno, R and Matthews, A and Breen, C and Burns, L
Keywords: Drug driving, Roadside drug testing
Journal or Publication Title: Accident Analysis and Prevention
Publisher: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN: 0001-4575
DOI / ID Number: 10.1016/j.aap.2017.05.008
Copyright Information:

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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