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MAXCOG—Maximizing Cognition: a randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation for people with mild cognitive impairment and early Alzheimer Disease

Regan, B, Wells, Y, Farrow, M ORCID: 0000-0003-0302-9426, O'Halloran, P and Workman, B 2017 , 'MAXCOG—Maximizing Cognition: a randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation for people with mild cognitive impairment and early Alzheimer Disease' , American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 25, no. 3 , pp. 258-269 , doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.11.008.

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Abstract

Objectives:To review the efficacy of a home-based four-session individualized face-to-face cognitive rehabilitation (MAXCOG) intervention for clients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or early dementia and their close supporters.Design:Randomized controlled trial comparing the intervention group (MAXCOG) with treatment as usual (control).Participants:A total of 55 client–supporter dyads were enrolled in the study and 40 completed; 25 client–supporter dyads completed MAXCOG and 15 completed treatment as usual. Both MAXCOG and control groups included more MCI cases than dementia (22 versus 3 and 12 versus 3, respectively).Intervention:Four weekly individual sessions of MAXCOG consisting of personalized interventions to address individually relevant goals, supported by the provision of the MAXCOG information resource.Measures:The primary outcomes were goal performance and satisfaction, assessed using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Questionnaires assessing mood, illness adjustment, quality of life, and carer burden were also administered.Results:The intervention group displayed significantly higher performance and satisfaction with primary goals on the COPM post-intervention than the control group, using a per-protocol analysis.Conclusions:The MAXCOG intervention is effective in improving goal performance and satisfaction in clients with MCI and early dementia.

Item Type: Article
Authors/Creators:Regan, B and Wells, Y and Farrow, M and O'Halloran, P and Workman, B
Keywords: Mild cognitive impairment, dementia, cognitive rehabilitation, clinometric, translational
Journal or Publication Title: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Publisher: Elsevier Inc.
ISSN: 1064-7481
DOI / ID Number: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.11.008
Copyright Information:

Copyright 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

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