Open Access Repository

Disentangling Body Image: The Relative Associations of Overvaluation, Dissatisfaction, and Preoccupation with Psychological Distress and Eating Disorder Behaviors in Male and Female Adolescents

Mitchison, D, Hay, P, Griffiths, S, Murray, SB, Bentley, C, Gratwick-Sarll, K, Harrison, C and Mond, JM ORCID: 0000-0002-0410-091X 2017 , 'Disentangling Body Image: The Relative Associations of Overvaluation, Dissatisfaction, and Preoccupation with Psychological Distress and Eating Disorder Behaviors in Male and Female Adolescents' , International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol. 50, no. 2 , 118–126 , doi: 10.1002/eat.22592.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Objective: The distinctiveness and relativeclinical significance of overvaluation,dissatisfaction, and preoccupation withbody weight/shape remains inconclusive.This study sought to add to the evidenceby testing associations between thesethree body image constructs and indicatorsof clinical significance.Method: Male and female secondarystudents (N5 1,666) aged 12–18 yearscompleted a survey that included measuresof dissatisfaction with, overvaluationof, and preoccupation with weight/shape, psychological distress, eating disorderbehaviors, and basic demographicinformation. Conditional process analysiswas employed to test the independentand mediating effects of overvaluation,dissatisfaction, and preoccupation on distress,dietary restraint, and objectivebinge eating.Results: Overvaluation, dissatisfaction,and preoccupation were highly correlated(r5 0.47–0.84). In girls, preoccupationdemonstrated the strongest independentand mediating effects on distress, dietaryrestraint, and binge eating; whereas neitherthe direct or indirect effects of dissatisfactionon distress and overvaluation onbinge eating were significant. Amongboys however, the direct and indirecteffects of overvaluation, dissatisfaction,and preoccupation on distress and eatingdisorder behaviors were relatively equal.Discussion: Preoccupation with weight/shape may be particularly clinically significantin girls, whereas all constructs ofbody image disturbance may be equallyclinically significant in boys. The findingsare consistent with the view that theseconstructs, while closely related, are distinct.

Item Type: Article
Authors/Creators:Mitchison, D and Hay, P and Griffiths, S and Murray, SB and Bentley, C and Gratwick-Sarll, K and Harrison, C and Mond, JM
Keywords: mediation; communitybased; body image; dissatisfaction; preoccupation; overvaluation; boys; girls; eating disorder behaviours
Journal or Publication Title: International Journal of Eating Disorders
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Inc
ISSN: 0276-3478
DOI / ID Number: 10.1002/eat.22592
Copyright Information:

Copyright 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Related URLs:
Item Statistics: View statistics for this item

Actions (login required)

Item Control Page Item Control Page
TOP