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Detection of Miamiensis avidus (Ciliophora: Scuticociliatia) and Cardicola spp. (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) DNA in biofouling from southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii pontoons off Port Lincoln, South Australia

Power, C, Balli Garza, J, Evans, D, Nowak, BF ORCID: 0000-0002-0347-643X, Bridle, AR ORCID: 0000-0002-5788-1297 and Bott, NJ 2019 , 'Detection of Miamiensis avidus (Ciliophora: Scuticociliatia) and Cardicola spp. (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) DNA in biofouling from southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii pontoons off Port Lincoln, South Australia' , Aquaculture, vol. 502 , pp. 128-133 , doi: 10.1016/j.aquaculture.2018.12.027.

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Abstract

Presence of biofouling on pontoons and other structures can have adverse effects on fish health, both by affectingwater quality and acting as a reservoir for pathogens. This study focused on three species of parasites affectingSouthern Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus maccoyii) (SBT): the blood flukes Cardicola forsteri and Cardicola orientalis andthe scuticociliate Miamiensis avidus. Blood flukes are the main health concern for SBT. They have two free livingstages (miracidium and cercaria) and their intermediate host can be present in biofouling. Miamiensis avidus(Ciliophora: Scuticociliata) is an opportunistic pathogen thought to be the causative agent of swimmer syndromein SBT. To determine if biofouling is a reservoir for blood flukes or M. avidus six perspex plates and six net pieceswere deployed in two SBT pontoons at one and four meter depths and sampled one and three months afterdeployment. Biofouling samples were rarely positive for blood fluke DNA based on qPCR detection, but theywere most frequently detected on plate samples at 3 months. Prevalence of Miamiensis avidus based on qPCRdetection increased from 38% at one month to 89% at three months. No significant difference was observedbetween depths at which the plates were deployed. Miamiensis avidus was detected from total DNA extractedfrom a wide range of taxonomic groups collected from the fouling samples. Results suggest that biofouling mayact as a reservoir for M. avidus in aquaculture. Monitoring environmental reservoirs may be an important nondestructivesurveillance tool. Further optimization of the detection in biofouling may provide insights into host-pathogeninteractions which will inform aquatic animal health management. This approach could also be appliedto the surveillance of other potential aquaculture pathogens affecting species farmed in marine pontoons.

Item Type: Article
Authors/Creators:Power, C and Balli Garza, J and Evans, D and Nowak, BF and Bridle, AR and Bott, NJ
Keywords: Miamiensis avidus, Cardicola, Thunnus maccoyii, Scuticociliate, biofouling, southern bluefin tuna
Journal or Publication Title: Aquaculture
Publisher: Elsevier Science Bv
ISSN: 0044-8486
DOI / ID Number: 10.1016/j.aquaculture.2018.12.027
Copyright Information:

Copyright 2018 Elsevier B.V.

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