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Association of body composition, physical activity and physical performance with knee cartilage thickness and bone area in young adults

Meng, T, Antony, B ORCID: 0000-0001-8704-6084, Venn, A ORCID: 0000-0001-7090-1398, Eckstein, F, Cicuttini, F, March, L, Cross, M, Dwyer, T, Blizzard, L ORCID: 0000-0002-9541-6943, Jones, G ORCID: 0000-0002-9814-0006, Laslett, LL ORCID: 0000-0002-4336-0095 and Ding, C ORCID: 0000-0002-9479-730X 2019 , 'Association of body composition, physical activity and physical performance with knee cartilage thickness and bone area in young adults' , Rheumatology , pp. 1-10 , doi: 10.1093/rheumatology/kez498.

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Abstract

Objective: To describe associations of body composition, physical activity and physical performance with knee cartilage thickness and subchondral bone area in young adults.Methods: Body composition, physical activity and physical performance were measured 4-5 years prior to knee MRI. Cartilage thickness and bone area were measured quantitatively from MRI. Associations were assessed using linear regression analysis, with mediators being identified using mediation analysis.Results: Participants (n = 186) were 31-41 years of age when the MRI was acquired and 48% were female. Greater lean mass was positively associated with cartilage thickness [β = 6.52 μm/kg (95% CI 0.86, 12.18)] and bone area [β = 13.37 mm2/kg (95% CI 5.43, 21.31)]. Physical performance measures were positively associated with cartilage thickness [long jump: β = 2.44 μm/cm (95% CI 0.70, 4.18); hand grip strength: 7.74 μm/kg (95% CI 1.50, 13.98); physical work capacity: 1.07 μm/W (95% CI 0.29, 1.85)] and bone area [long jump: β = 3.99 mm2/cm (95% CI 0.64, 7.34); hand grip strength: 19.06 mm2/kg (95% CI 7.21, 30.92); leg strength: 3.18 mm2/kg (95% CI 1.09, 5.28); physical work capacity: 3.15 mm2/W (95% CI 1.70, 4.60)]. Mediation analysis suggested these associations were mediated by lean mass (effect mediated: 27-95%).Conclusion: Greater lean mass and better physical performance measured 4-5 years prior were associated with greater knee cartilage thickness and subchondral bone area in young adults, and the associations of physical performance were largely mediated by lean mass. These findings suggest lean mass may play an important role in maintaining knee joint health in young adults.

Item Type: Article
Authors/Creators:Meng, T and Antony, B and Venn, A and Eckstein, F and Cicuttini, F and March, L and Cross, M and Dwyer, T and Blizzard, L and Jones, G and Laslett, LL and Ding, C
Keywords: osteoarthritis, knee, cartilage, epidemiology, MRI
Journal or Publication Title: Rheumatology
Publisher: Oxford Univ Press
ISSN: 1462-0324
DOI / ID Number: 10.1093/rheumatology/kez498
Copyright Information:

Copyright The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

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