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Using metamemory measures and memory tests to estimate eyewitness free recall performance

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Saraiva, RB, Hope, L, Horselenberg, R, Ost, J, Sauer, J ORCID: 0000-0002-0872-3647 and van Koppen, PJ 2020 , 'Using metamemory measures and memory tests to estimate eyewitness free recall performance' , Memory, vol. 28, no. 1 , pp. 94-106 , doi: 10.1080/09658211.2019.1688835.

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Abstract

Using a mock witness methodology, we investigated the predictive value of metamemory measures and objective memory tests as indicators of eyewitness free recall performance. Participants (n = 208) first completed a metamemory assessment that included assessments of self-rated memory capacity, memory development and use of strategies. In a separate session, participants watched a mock-crime video and provided a free recall account, followed by one out of four independent memory tests (i.e., free recall, cued recall, face recognition and general knowledge). Accuracy, amount of details reported, confidence and over/underconfidence in the eyewitness free recall were the main dependent variables. Results indicated three main findings: (1) subjective assessments of memory capacity were not related to eyewitness free recall performance; (2) although individual confidence and over/underconfidence was somewhat stable across different memory tests, accuracy was less stable; and (3) individuals with higher self-rated memory capacity had a slightly stronger confidence-accuracy relation in free recall. These results are discussed with respect to metamemory assessments and performance stability across memory tests of different domains.

Item Type: Article
Authors/Creators:Saraiva, RB and Hope, L and Horselenberg, R and Ost, J and Sauer, J and van Koppen, PJ
Keywords: eyewitness testimony, confidence, free recall, memory, metamemory
Journal or Publication Title: Memory
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISSN: 0965-8211
DOI / ID Number: 10.1080/09658211.2019.1688835
Copyright Information:

© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Memory on 7 November 2019, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2019.1688835

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