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Relationship between southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii, melanomacrophage centres and Cardicola spp. (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) infection

Widdicombe, M, Power, C, Van Gelderen, R, Nowak, BF ORCID: 0000-0002-0347-643X and Bott, NJ 2020 , 'Relationship between southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii, melanomacrophage centres and Cardicola spp. (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) infection' , Fish and Shellfish Immunology, vol. 106 , pp. 859-865 , doi: 10.1016/j.fsi.2020.09.004.

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Abstract

Southern Bluefin Tuna (SBT), Thunnus maccoyii, is ranched off Port Lincoln, South Australia and is Australia's second largest economic finfish aquaculture industry. The biggest threats to SBT health identified by the industry are the blood flukes Cardicola forsteri and C. orientalis (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae). Melanomacrophage centres (MMCs) are aggregations of pigmented macrophage like cells present in spleen, kidney and liver of teleost fish. The aim of this study was to quantify MMCs in SBT anterior kidney, liver and spleen to investigate changes in relation to Cardicola spp. Infection. Samples were collected at the end of ranching from pontoons where SBT were treated with PZQ and pontoons with untreated SBT. SBT MMC percentage of surface area cover was highest in SBT spleen and lowest in the liver. Significant positive correlations were identified between SBT MMC area and SBT size in all three organs (p Cardicola spp. gill egg counts, and in the kidney for C. forsteri DNA from SBT hearts and gills (p Cardicola spp. Infection and MMCs have the potential to be used as an indicator to assess health effects that Cardicola spp. have on SBT.

Item Type: Article
Authors/Creators:Widdicombe, M and Power, C and Van Gelderen, R and Nowak, BF and Bott, NJ
Keywords: Thunnus maccoyii, southern bluefin tuna, Cardicola spp., blood fluke, melanomacrophage, histology, aquaculture, image analysis
Journal or Publication Title: Fish and Shellfish Immunology
Publisher: Academic Press Ltd Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN: 1050-4648
DOI / ID Number: 10.1016/j.fsi.2020.09.004
Copyright Information:

Copyright 2020 Elsevier Ltd.

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