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Childhood allergic rhinitis predicts asthma incidence and persistence to middle age: A longitudinal study

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Burgess, JA and Dharmage, SC and Walters, EH and Byrnes, GB and Matheson, MC and Jenkins, MA and Wharton, CL and Johns, DP and Abramson, MJ and Hopper, JL (2007) Childhood allergic rhinitis predicts asthma incidence and persistence to middle age: A longitudinal study. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 120 (4). pp. 863-869. ISSN 0091-6749

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Abstract

Background: The association between allergic rhinitis and
asthma is well documented, but the temporal sequence of this
association has not been closely examined.
Objective: We sought to assess the associations between
childhood allergic rhinitis and (1) asthma incidence from
preadolescence to middle age and (2) asthma persistence to
middle age.
Methods: Data were gathered from the 1968, 1974, and 2004
surveys of the Tasmanian Asthma Study. Cox regression was
used to examine the association between childhood allergic
rhinitis and asthma incidence in preadolescence, adolescence,
and adult life. Binomial regression was used to examine the
association between childhood allergic rhinitis and asthma
beginning before the age of 7 years and persisting at age 44
years.
Results: Childhood allergic rhinitis was associated with a
significant 2- to 7-fold increased risk of incident asthma in
preadolescence, adolescence, or adult life. Childhood allergic
rhinitis was associated with a 3-fold increased risk of childhood
asthma persisting compared with remitting by middle age.
Conclusions: Childhood allergic rhinitis increased the
likelihood of new-onset asthma after childhood and the
likelihood of having persisting asthma from childhood into
middle age.
Clinical implications: Asthma burden in later life might be
reduced by more aggressive treatment of allergic rhinitis in
early life. (J Allergy Clin Immunol 2007;120:863-9.)
Key words: Childhood allergic rhinitis, incident asthma, persisting
asthma, effect modification

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Childhood allergic rhinitis, incident asthma, persisting asthma, effect modification
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Publisher: Mosby, Inc.
Page Range: pp. 863-869
ISSN: 0091-6749
Identification Number - DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2007.07.020
Additional Information:

The definitive version is available at http://www.sciencedirect.com

Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2008 14:06
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:33
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