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Grounds for movement: Green school grounds as sites for promoting physical activity

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Dyment, JE and Bell, A (2007) Grounds for movement: Green school grounds as sites for promoting physical activity. Health Education Research. pp. 1-11. ISSN 0268-1153

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Abstract

An environmental factor of particular importance
to children’s physical activity levels appears
to be the presence of parks and open
space. Thus, in promoting children’s health,
school grounds merit consideration as a potential
setting for intervention. This paper explores
how ‘green’ school grounds, which contain
a greater diversity of landscaping and design
features, affect the quantity and quality of physical
activity among elementary school children.
Teachers, parents and administrators associated
with 59 schools across Canada completed
questionnaires (n 5 105). Analysis reveals that
through greening, school grounds diversify the
play repertoire, creating opportunities for boys
and girls of all ages, interests and abilities to
be more physically active. Complementing the
rule-bound, competitive games supported by asphalt
and turf playing fields, green school
grounds invite children to jump, climb, dig, lift,
rake, build, role play and generally get moving
in ways that nurture all aspects of their health
and development. Of particular significance
is the potential to encourage moderate and
light levels of physical activity by increasing
the range of enjoyable, non-competitive, openended
forms of play at school. Seen in this light,green school grounds stand to be an important
intervention to be included in school health promotion
initiatives.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Health Education Research
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Page Range: pp. 1-11
ISSN: 0268-1153
Identification Number - DOI: 10.1093/her/cym059
Additional Information:

The definitive publisher-authenticated version http://www.oxfordjournals.org/

Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2008 14:10
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:33
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