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Targeted LOWering of central blood pressure in patients with hypertension: baseline recruitment, rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial (The LOW CBP study)

Sharman, JE ORCID: 0000-0003-2792-0811, Stanton, T, Reid, CM, Keech, A, Roberts-Thomson, P, Stewart, S, Greenough, R, Stowasser, M and Abhayaratna, WP 2017 , 'Targeted LOWering of central blood pressure in patients with hypertension: baseline recruitment, rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial (The LOW CBP study)' , Contemporary Clinical Trials, vol. 62 , pp. 37-42 , doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2017.08.010.

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Abstract

Background: High blood pressure (BP) is the most common modifiable cause of death from cardiovascular disease. Lowering BP with medication improves patient outcomes, but even in populations with normal upper arm (brachial) BP there remains considerable residual risk for cardiovascular disease and this may be due to persistently elevated central BP. There has never been a trial to determine the value of targeted central BP lowering among patients with hypertension, and this was the aim of this study.Methods: This is a multi-centre, randomized, open-label, blinded endpoint trial among 308 patients treated for uncomplicated hypertension with controlled brachial BP (Conclusions: Compared with control, intervention is expected to significantly lower left ventricular mass index, and this effect is expected to be independently correlated with central BP lowering. These findings would support the concept of central BP as an important therapeutic target in hypertension management. Results are expected in 2018.

Item Type: Article
Authors/Creators:Sharman, JE and Stanton, T and Reid, CM and Keech, A and Roberts-Thomson, P and Stewart, S and Greenough, R and Stowasser, M and Abhayaratna, WP
Keywords: arteries, ascending aorta, myocardial, hypertension, therapy
Journal or Publication Title: Contemporary Clinical Trials
Publisher: Elsevier Inc.
ISSN: 1551-7144
DOI / ID Number: 10.1016/j.cct.2017.08.010
Copyright Information:

© 2017 Elsevier

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