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DNA probes, targeting large sub-unit rRNA, for the rapid identification of the paralytic shellfish poison producing dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium catenatum

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Rhodes, L and Smith, K and de Salas, MF (2007) DNA probes, targeting large sub-unit rRNA, for the rapid identification of the paralytic shellfish poison producing dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium catenatum. New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research, 41 (4). pp. 385-390. ISSN 0028-8330

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Abstract

The dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum was first observed in New Zealand at Manukau Harbour on the west coast of the North Island in May 2000. At that time, a strong correlation was evident between the micro-algal bloom and the occurrence of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSP) in shellfish. This paper describes the design and testing of oligonucletide probes targeting the large sub-unit (LSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of G. catenatum. The probes were developed in fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) and sandwich hybridisation assay (SHA) format to rapidly differentiate the target PSP producer from non-toxic look-alike dinoflagellates. Specificity was affirmed by testing the probes against dinoflagellate and flagellate isolates.

The dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum was first observed in New Zealand at Manukau Harbour on the west coast of the North Island in May 2000. At that time, a strong correlation was evident between the micro-algal bloom and the occurrence of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSP) in shellfish. This paper describes the design and testing of oligonucletide probes targeting the large sub-unit (LSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of G. catenatum. The probes were developed in fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) and sandwich hybridisation assay (SHA) format to rapidly differentiate the target PSP producer from non-toxic look-alike dinoflagellates. Specificity was affirmed by testing the probes against dinoflagellate and flagellate isolates.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH); sandwich hybridisation assay (SHA); harmful algal blooms; oligonucleotide probes
Journal or Publication Title: New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research
Publisher: R S N Z Publishing
Page Range: pp. 385-390
ISSN: 0028-8330
Additional Information:

© The Royal Society of New Zealand 2007

Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2008 14:24
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:34
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