Please Note:

The Open Access Repository has moved to a new authentication system as of the 1st of November.

Account holders will now be able to login using their University of Tasmania credentials.
If you have trouble logging in please email us on E.Prints@utas.edu.au so we can assist you.

Public users can still access the records in this repository as normal

Open Access Repository

Coastal marine methyl iodide source and links to new particle formation at Cape Grim during February 2006

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Grose, MR and Cainey, JM and McMinn, A and Gibson, JAE (2007) Coastal marine methyl iodide source and links to new particle formation at Cape Grim during February 2006. Environmental Chemistry, 4 (3). pp. 172-177. ISSN 1448-2517

[img] PDF
4204.pdf | Request a copy
Full text restricted
Available under University of Tasmania Standard License.

Abstract

. Methyl iodide concentration in seawater and in the air directly above the sea was measured at an inshore site adjacent to the Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station (Cape Grim BAPS) near a bed of Bull Kelp (Durvillaea potatorum) over daylight cycles and along a transect out to 5 km offshore. Most inshore samples had low and variable methyl iodide concentrations in seawater (14.8–57.7 pM) and in air immediately above the sea (2.1–3.8 parts per trillion by volume), with a partial tidal influence. A period of elevated methyl iodide concentration in the water (144.5 pM) and in air above the sea surface (5.5 pptv) was immediately followed by a measurement of new particles at the Cape Grim BAPS. This correlation provided indirect evidence that emission of methyl iodide from kelp is connected to the new particle formation pathway, but there was no evidence of a direct causal link. Elevated levels of atmospheric methyl iodide were not detected at the station (adjacent to the site but on top of a 94-m cliff) at the same time, which suggests the effect was localised above the sea surface. A rapid decrease of methyl iodide out to 5 km suggested that a source at the coastal reef was greater than from pelagic phytoplankton; this source could be the intertidal kelp beds.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: aerosols, biogenic production, halogen compounds, kelp, marine chemistry, methyl iodide.
Journal or Publication Title: Environmental Chemistry
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Page Range: pp. 172-177
ISSN: 1448-2517
Identification Number - DOI: 10.1071/EN07008
Additional Information:

Copyright © 2007 CSIRO.

Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2008 14:27
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2014 03:34
Item Statistics: View statistics for this item

Actions (login required)

Item Control Page Item Control Page
TOP